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In 2012–13, work-related injury and disease cost the Australian economy $61.8 billion, representing 4.1% of GDP.

  • The majority of the cost (95%) was borne by individuals and society.
    • Workers bore 77%, the community 18% and employers 5%.
  • Injuries accounted for $28 billion (45%) of the cost.

Breakdown by age and sex

  • Human capital costs are calculated based on a valuation of potential production forgone due to a work-related injury or disease. For this reason, the unit cost is significantly higher for those aged 15–24 and 25–34 years and decreases as workers near retirement age.
  • The unit cost of a work-related injury or illness was significantly higher for males than for females. Incidents involving males accounted for nearly two thirds of the total economic cost while making up just over 60% of the total number of incidents.

Cost ($ million) of work-related injury and illness, by sex and age group, 2012–13

Age group

Total Cost ($ million)

Distribution (%)

Unit Cost

Injury

Disease

Total

Costs

Cases

$/case

15 to 24 years

 5,800

 6,900

 12,700

21

17

 143,700

25 to 34 years

 7,500

 9,600

 17,100

28

21

 156,500

35 to 44 years

 7,400

 9,500

 16,900

27

23

 139,100

45 to 54 years

 5,400

 5,900

 11,300

18

23

 91,400

55 years and over

 2,100

 1,600

 3,800

6

16

 43,800

Sex

 

 

 

 

 

 

Female

 9,300

 12,500

 21,900

35.4

39.8

 103,900

Male

 18,900

 21,000

 39,900

64.6

60.2

 125,000

Australia

 28,200

 33,500

 61,800

100

100

 116,700

Units are rounded to the nearest $100 million

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Last modified on Tuesday 8 August 2017 [1536|56031]