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The National Farmers' Federation present a simple four-step process for managing safety risks involved in stockyard handling.

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About this seminar

Working with animals can be unpredictable and dangerous, so it’s important to know how to protect yourself and your workers.

Filmed on-site at a farm in Coolac, NSW, this video takes us through a working stockyard to demonstrate four steps for identifying and managing work health and safety risks:

  1. Identify the hazards

  2. Assess the risks

  3. Remove or control the risks

  4. Review

It is an easy, user-friendly process for farm workers to improve the safety of their farms.

Who is this seminar for?

This video will be helpful for farmers, farm workers and managers, and anyone with an interest in the agriculture industry. It may also be informative to small business owners.

About the presenters

Stacey Wordsworth from the National Farmers’ Federation joins Tom Graham, a farmer and vet, on-site at Coolac NSW.

The video was produced by the National Farmers’ Federation under a grant provided by Safe Work Australia.

Additional resources

National Farmers' Federation: Stockyard Handling

Stacey Wordsworth and Tom Graham

§ (Background Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
Hi. I'm Stacey from the National Farmers' Federation. Agriculture can be a great industry to work in however it can be dangerous. High instances of injury and even death means we need to make farm safety a priority. The good news is you can take four simple steps to improve safety on your farm.
One is identify the hazard, 2 - assess the risk, 3 - remove or control the risk and 4 – review.
I'm here to visit Tom Graham, a farmer from Coolac who also happens to be a Vet. Tom's going to walk us through how he manages farm safety risks in his stockyards.

Tom Graham: 
G'day Stacey. How are you?

Stacey Wordsworth: 
G'day Tom.

Tom Graham: 
Welcome to Riverview

Stacey Wordsworth: 
It's nice to be here.

Tom Graham: 
Let me show you around the yards.

Stacey Wordsworth: 
Sounds good.

§ (Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
So Tom Step 1 is identifying hazards. We need to have a good look around the yards and ask ourselves can somebody be hurt?

Tom Graham: 
So set up properly. Yards are safer, easier and more efficient to work in. The people working in the yards make a big difference to how effectively things operate. If you take the crush for example, one of the more important parts is design and maintenance of the crush. It is important to also remember that the best designed crushers can still be dangerous.

§ (Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
That takes us to Step 2 of the process which is assessing the risk. What could happen here?

Tom Graham: 
I've seen things from broken limbs to cuts and abrasions and particularly at the front end people have lost teeth from the bars hitting them in the mouth.

Stacey Wordsworth: 
Tom Step 3 is removing or controlling the risk. It's not practical to get rid of the crush, so what have you done to remove or control the risk that is here?

Tom Graham: 
There's a couple of primary things up the front in the working area. As you can see we've replaced the ratchet arm system. The arm on the old head bale was getting dangerous. If I close this gate we also provide a safe and secure working area. The cattle are out here. We're in here. We can get on with the job at hand without being too worried about what's happening out there behind us.

Stacey Wordsworth: 
So what you've done here is isolate the risk by keeping a safe distance between the people and the cattle.

Tom Graham:
Yeah exactly.

§ (Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
Tom once you've identified the hazard, you've assessed the risk and you've done what you can to remove or control the risk, now it's time for Step 4 which is to check that it all works. That's something you can do at any time but right now what can we do to have a look at things we've done earlier today?

Tom Graham: 
Well firstly we'll just check our gate to make sure we are actually secure in here and then Kimberley's going to bring a bull up and we're going to catch him in the head bale and check out that everything is actually effective. Stacey with a fairly big bull it seems to be effective in holding him.

§ (Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
So Tom we're done for the day now.

Tom Graham: 
That was pretty simple actually.

Stacey Wordsworth: 
Thanks for showing us around. We'll let you get back to work.

Tom Graham:
Thanks Stacey.

§ (Music Playing) § 

Stacey Wordsworth: 
It's important to keep records to make sure what you've done is working. You can use a simple checklist or you may prefer a smartphone or a tablet to take photos or to make notes and if you ever do have an incident, records help demonstrate what you've done to keep people safe. 
For more information go to farmsafe.org.au.

§ (Music Playing) § 

[End of Transcript]


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Last modified on Thursday 27 September 2018 [8401|55861]