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Taronga Conservation Society is a joint-runner up for the 2017 Workplace Reward.

Taronga Conservation Society Australia is a not-for-profit organisation supporting wildlife conservation. Taronga cares for over 4,000 animals, many of which are threatened species.

With around 1,000 workers between its two zoos in Dubbo (Western Plains Zoo) and Sydney (Taronga), Taronga is focused on providing an inclusive WHS resource capability, accessible to all.

During National Safe Work Month in 2017, Taronga ran a safety initiative focused on sharing safety knowledge, and engaging and encouraging workers to have their say, capturing everyone’s ability to learn.

Taronga’s WHS Manager Valérie Moushigian and CEO Cameron Kerr with SWA Deputy CEO Amanda Grey
Pictured (L-R): Taronga’s WHS Manager Valérie Moushigian and CEO Cameron Kerr with SWA Deputy CEO Amanda Grey.

Taronga’s safety initiatives for National Safe Work Month included activities such as: Safety Bingo at a staff lunch, ‘Have Your Say’ posters created by staff, and team ‘Safety in Action’ posters competition, a review of safety induction e-learning modules for continuous improvement, and a WHS Committee meeting focusing on innovation and leadership.

In 2016, Taronga focused on reasons why to stay safe at work. In 2017, they expanded on this concept and teams were tasked with creating a poster that visually demonstrated how they stay safe at work.

‘Safety In Action’ posters created by staff to demonstrate how they stay safe at work.
Pictured: ‘Safety In Action’ posters created by staff to demonstrate how they stay safe at work.

Participation was high, engaging employees at all levels, particularly the Safety Bingo lunch.

Taronga continues to strive for improvement in WHS through its safety management system, TarongaSAFE. Its workplaces have a number of risks, both common and uncommon. These include but are certainly not limited to working with animals; working at heights, manual handling; slips, trips and falls; and fieldwork.

Carnivore keeper Ben Haynes shares his unique safety practices working with carnivores with SWA’s Amanda Grey and Amanda Johnston.
Pictured (L-R): Carnivore keeper Ben Haynes shares his unique safety practices working with carnivores with SWA’s Amanda Grey and Amanda Johnston.

It is common for Seal keepers to have limited contact with the seals during presentations, and for the animals to access the exhibit space after the zoo is closed. Along with seal presentations keepers are also required to do husbandry tasks such as cleaning the pools and exhibits. The seal keepers take special care when working around the pool and feeding the seals.

Seal keepers Brad McKenzie concluding the daily seal show.
Pictured (L-R): Seal keepers Brad McKenzie concluding the daily seal show.

Similarly elephant keepers not only care for and feed the elephants, but also clean their exhibits. They look out for manual handling risks and slippery surfaces. 

Elephant keeper Alexia Dalley cleans up after the elephants by removing manure from the exhibit and hosing down its floor.
Pictured: Elephant keeper Alexia Dalley cleans up after the elephants by removing manure from the exhibit and hosing down its floor.

Taronga continues to exemplify a strong commitment to work health and safety in an ever-changing and high-risk environment. We look forward to seeing continued progress!

A video case study of the 2017 Workplace Reward winner will be available in the coming months.

This site is undergoing constant refinement. If you have noticed something that needs attention or have ideas for the site please let us know.

Last modified on Thursday 3 May 2018 [9531|72301]